Using Tech Tools

Spring                                                Waning Bee Hiving Moon

This morning Kate and I had our weekly business meeting.  Those Amazon books add up.  We’re well into the first growing season with Kate retired.  It makes the whole process seem less urgent, more manageable from my perspective.  I like that.  Having Mark here right now helps, too.

After that I checked my translation on Diana and Actaeon, the 10 verses I’m preparing for my reading/translation lesson on Friday.  The second time through I found several things I missed the first time.  I believe my translation is improving, improving quickly right now.  Some sort of developmental break through, I suppose.

After that I fiddled with Firefox 4.0.  It’s the latest version of the favorite non-windows browser though I understand Chrome (Google) has begun to catch up.  It seems to be a bit slower with g-mail and the MIA website, but it makes up for it with its cool new feature, Panorama.  Panorama allows you to group frequently used tabs together in transparent collections accessible through a small tab at the top of the browser.

This way, when I move into Latin, for example, I can click once and up comes Perseus with my section of the Metamorphoses already loaded, along with the word find tool.  Another example, a weather tab holds my Andover NOAA page, Paul Douglas’ blog, Chanhassen NOAA weather story and a moon phase calendar.  All one click away.  Pretty neat.

It’s also time to start working on my Spanish tour for next week.  I called up Microsoft Notes, a program I wonder how I worked without now.  I opened a new notebook, titled it Art History Research and put in a tab, Spanish Tour May 5, 2011.  Now I’ll have my tours all in one handy place with talking points beside each piece.  Pretty neat.

A guy like me, who switches between diverse interests with regularity throughout a day and a week, finds work accelerated in pleasant ways with these organizational tools.

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